Roll of Honour

Corporal

James Paterson

Student

James Paterson was born in Glasgow on 19 May 1897, to James and Frances Anna Paterson of Milngavie. His father was a tea merchant and partner with William Wright & Co of Glasgow, serving as the Scottish Representative on the Tea Control Committee of the Ministry of Food during the First World War. James Paterson senior was later Provost of Milngavie from 1930-1936.

Memorial chapel at the University of Glasgow
The Memorial Chapel at the University of Glasgow

Young James attended Allan Glen’s School before matriculating at the University of Glasgow in 1913 to take a degree in Pure Science. Under a scheme of affiliation of 1912, students of science and engineering in Glasgow could choose to take the qualifying classes towards their degree either at the University, or at the Royal Technical College of Glasgow (now the University of Strathclyde), or at both institutions. James opted to study concurrently at the Royal Technical College, where he followed the first two years of the set curriculum in Chemistry during sessions 1913-1914 and 1914-1915, winning first-class certificates of merit for many of his subjects. War then interrupted his studies and he joined the 1st Battalion Special Brigade Royal Engineers, with service number 106146. This Special Brigade was involved in the use of chemical warfare.

Corporal James Paterson was killed in action on the 24th August 1916, aged 19, and is buried in the Sailly-au-Bois Military Cemetery, between Amiens and Arras. He was awarded the Victory Medal and the British War Medal, and his effects were passed to his father.

As well as being commemorated on the University of Glasgow war memorial, James is remembered on the Roll of Honour of the Royal Technical College, on the Milngavie war memorial, and on the memorial at Milngavie Golf Club.

Comments and Citations

University of Glasgow Faculty and Registry Records GUAS Ref: R8/5/34/6 and R8/5/35/6 (Matriculation Albums).

With thanks to Anne Cameron for providing further details from the University of Strathclyde registry records.

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