Log-in / Register

Not yet registered? Register Here.

Dennis Cyril Gilles

Biography of Dennis Cyril Gilles

Dennis Cyril Gilles was the first Chair of Computing Science at the University of Glasgow in 1966.

Gilles had studied at the Imperial College of Science and Technology, University of London. After an initial period of teaching in Liverpool, he joined, in 1949, the staff of Scientific Computing Service Ltd., returning in 1955 to computer research in the Computing Machine Laboratory of the University of Manchester.

In 1957, the University of Glasgow appointed Dr Gilles to establish a computing laboratory, and became the first university in Scotland to have an electronic computer. That same year the Glasgow Branch of the British Computer Society, The Chartered Institute for IT, was founded and Gilles chaired the inaugural meeting on 11 November. Gilles directed the computer laboratory from its modest beginnings with the Deuce Computer to the KDF 9 computing system.

Latterly, Professor Emeritus of Computing Science, Professor Gilles died on 5 October 2013.

Summary

Dennis Cyril Gilles
Born 1925.
Died 5 October 2013.
University Link: Professor
GU Degree:
Occupation categories: computer scientists
Record last updated: 19th Sep 2014

University Connections

University Roles

  • Professor

Buildings

On This Day Entries

There is 1 comment available. Log in using the box in the top right of the page to post a comment. No user account? Register here.

Posted by A Buchanan at 17:15:25 on 9 November 2015

In 1966, Professor Gilles allowed me to attend the Higher Ordinary Class in Computing as a private student. I was then studying for an MA, and Computing was not at that time a valid part of an MA degree. He also, in 1967, issued me with a letter confirming my attendance at the course, and stating that I had passed the June exams for the class. This allowed me to pursue a successful career in computing, a career which gave me great satisfaction. In current times, I suspect this degree of flexibility would not be possible, or, if it were, there would be a cost to the student. I am very grateful to Professor Gilles for the opportunities he opened up for me.