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Neville George

Biography of Neville George

Sir Edward Bailey (centre) and Thomas George (right)
Sir Edward Bailey (centre) and Thomas George (right)

Thomas Neville George (1904-1980) was Professor of Geology at the University from 1947 to 1974. He was Dean of the Faculty of Science, 1951 to 1955, and played a key role in the planning and building of the new Geology Building, which opened in 1974 shortly after he retired.

Born in Swansea, George studied at the University of Wales, St John's College, Cambridge, and Birbeck College. He was appointed a Fellow of the University of Wales in 1926, and Professor of Geology and the head of the Department of Geology and Geography at University College, Swansea (succeeding Arthur Trueman), in 1933.

George succeeded Trueman once more in 1947, when he was appointed to the Chair in Glasgow. His main research interests were carboniferous rocks and fossils, evolution, and geomorphology and palaeogeography. He served on a number of University committees, including the Library Committee, and he was closely involved in planning the construction of a new University Library. He held a number of public offices including those of President of the Association of University Teachers, 1959 to 1960, and of the Geological Society of London from 1968 to 1970.

Summary

Neville George
Geologist

Born 13 May 1904, Swansea, Wales.
Died 18 June 1980.
University Link: Faculty Dean, Professor
Occupation categories: geologists
NNAF Reference: GB/NNAF/P141323
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Record last updated: 14th Aug 2008

University Connections

University Roles

  • Faculty Dean, 1951-1955
  • Professor

Academic Posts

Professorships:

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Posted by Dr James Silverton at 20:35:51 on 13 December 2011

May I contribute one appreciation of Neville George. I was only a student of Geology for one year but I still remember his exceptionally clear expostion of the Theory of Evolution. I have never seen any need to alter what I was taught.